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amycurl
Jan. 29th, 2009 01:10 am (UTC)
Let the record show that Washington, DC public schools were open--only delayed for 2 hours.

In the county where I work, they will close school because a few years ago, a high school student was killed while trying to get to school on an icy/slushy road. It only takes one....

In places like Chicago, where the majority of the school population is located geographically close to the school, has access to decent public transportation, or can walk, it's a whole different ball of wax than when you have geographically sprawling, suburban/rural districts where none of those factors are present.

In some ways, it's like comparing apples to oranges.....

(Although, as someone who heard the audio of that press conference, I *loved* the tone of it. They were all laughing...it was great!)
gatsbyfan
Jan. 30th, 2009 06:10 pm (UTC)
Yes, but...

My grammar school was over a mile away and I had to walk down the middle of the street to get there on more than one occasion. And in high school I would have still had to walk either 7 blocks and take one bus or 4 blocks and take two buses. Both of which were the suburban line which meant they only came about once every 30 minutes. (Thankfully my friend's dad could take us before I got my car when I was 17.)

If I went to the Public high school it would have been worse because the closest high school was still not easy to get to. At least two different buses.

Plus, CPS has many magnet schools which means kids are bused to other areas of the city. Not the school a block away.

Several of our Suburbs have just as much sprawl. My cousin lives in a burb up north. There are several hills. Those hills become a mess during winter. I think school was canceled once for her. And it was only because cars were literally sliding down the road sideways because of the ice.
flippet
Jan. 30th, 2009 07:45 pm (UTC)
it's a whole different ball of wax than when you have geographically sprawling, suburban/rural districts where none of those factors are present.

In some ways, it's like comparing apples to oranges.....


That is true. And I do make allowances, to an extent, for simply not owning the equipment to be able to handle the weather. It makes more of a difference here than we account for, a lot of the time.

But what makes me roll my eyes is, like comments on the story were saying, this is a place that generally gets a halfway decent snowstorm at least once a winter. It's not unheard of. But get half an inch on the ground, and people are looking up like 'what is this strange white stuff falling from the sky? I must consult the oracle for instructions on what to do!'