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mad men: 'my old kentucky home'


Another Sunday, another episode of GOOD tv.  Tonight's installment:

Season 3 Episode 3: My Old Kentucky Home
The writers fight off boredom when they are forced to work after hours. Roger hosts a party while Joan and Greg host a party of their own. Sally has a run in with Grandpa.

I may have to hide my remote because I have a feeling I'm going to want to throw it at the tv at Greg, the rapist.

You know the drill, grab your cocktail and come in and chat about Don and the rest of the gang at Sterling Cooper.


Comments

( 18 comments — Leave a comment )
gatsbyfan
Aug. 31st, 2009 03:17 am (UTC)
Best line of the episode: : "I'm Peggy Olson, and I want to smoke some marijuana."

What an episode.

I'll get my obligatory Sally comment out of the way. Dear god that poor child is going to be in therapy for years or have one hell of a drinking problem.

Epic looks from Joan and Jane. If looks could kill, Jane would be laying in a pool of her own blood. And frankly after that "I keep loosing weight" comment she deserves bad things.

I love how defiant Peggy is in her desire to smoke pot. Loved her line after Paul and his drug dealing friend finish singing, “I am so high’.
gatsbyfan
Aug. 31st, 2009 03:26 am (UTC)
I feel sorry for Joan. She thought she hitched her wagon to a rising star. She could overlook the incident from last year.

"Joanie, I don't want to have a fight right now."
"Then stop talking."

She clearly knows how to handle him. But I really think she's thrown for a loop when she finds out about his patient dying. And it's pretty clear that the chief's wife isn't a fan of her husband. I wonder if there was more to her urging Joan not to get pregnant?

I felt so bad for her at the end with the accordion. (But how amazing was that? She could make that look sexy.) She is not a happy camper.
gatsbyfan
Aug. 31st, 2009 03:38 am (UTC)
I think the most awkward moments in this weeks episode involved Roger.

Roger in black face was just painful. I felt almost as uncomfortable in that moment as Don did. I just wanted to get away. I realize that I'm looking on it with modern eyes, but oh how awful.

The altercation with Don is also awkward. Roger confronts Don after he sees his wife grabbing at Don. Hey, it's not Don's fault Jane got plastered and can't control her booze.

Don: 'No one thinks your happy they think your foolish'
Roger: 'That’s a great thing about places like this. You can come here and be happy and you get to chose your guests.'

Poor delusional Roger. He just doesn't get it. Most people think he is a fool. They aren't jealous of him. They feel sorry for him.
gatsbyfan
Aug. 31st, 2009 03:40 am (UTC)
Last two things before I go to sleep.

Pete has mad skills on the dance floor.

(And it was almost sad how good Pete and Trudy were dancing.)

Don didn't sleep with anyone. That's two episodes in a row. I think that might be a record. He's really trying.
tomfoolery815
Aug. 31st, 2009 07:20 am (UTC)
Don didn't sleep with anyone. That's two episodes in a row. I think that might be a record. He's really trying.
BWAH! Gatzy shoots, Gatzy scores! That was a beautiful scene at the end between Don and Betty, gorgeously photographed.

Pete has mad skills on the dance floor. (And it was almost sad how good Pete and Trudy were dancing.)
He does! But yes, now we know why Trudy kept bringing up dancing. They had a plan.
tomfoolery815
Aug. 31st, 2009 07:25 am (UTC)
But I really think she's thrown for a loop when she finds out about his patient dying.
Definitely.

And it's pretty clear that the chief's wife isn't a fan of her husband.
Yes. That was awfully patronizing, the comment about how "the fact that Greg can get a woman like you makes me feel good about his future, no matter what happens."

I felt so bad for her at the end with the accordion. (But how amazing was that? She could make that look sexy.)
Umm, yes. She is officially the hottest accordion player ever.

She is not a happy camper.
The look she shot Greg in the middle of the song? He could have been the second person laying in a pool of his own blood that week. ;-)
tomfoolery815
Aug. 31st, 2009 06:22 pm (UTC)
I like the sly running commentary about pedigree running through this episode. Besides Connie (Sepinwall's readers have deduced that that's Conrad Hilton) pointing out to Don that he's come a long way from parking cars at a roadhouse, there's ... well, almost everything that comes out of Paul's mouth in this episode.

"Don’t I seem as important as Cosgrove? I mean, Campbell makes sense. To the manor born." Then, when his "drug pusher" classmate ("Jeffrey Graves. Princeton '55.") arrives, it's all very Andy Bernard. Especially when he was all pistols-at-10-paces at the suggestion that he was kicked out of the TigerTones for being too ... tall. :-)

Sure Paul, you're Ivy League ("We got it. You're educated."), but you've apparently leaned too heavily on that, expecting that line on your resume to do all the work. If this is a race, you're even with the graduate of Miss Deaver's Secretarial School.

Smitty, who seems to realize it's actually about talent, was great in this episode.

Jeffrey: You're looking at the two great coxmen of Princeton '55.
Smitty: Oh, the times you must have had. (looks at his bag) Can we buy some dope?


Edited at 2009-08-31 06:22 pm (UTC)
marymary
Aug. 31st, 2009 10:44 pm (UTC)
Hey, guys. LOVED this episode, because I'm such a freak for great lines. This one was the funniest ep I've seen in awhile. You guys picked up on several that I loved. I also liked this, mostly bc of Don's delivery.

Betty's dad: "You people. Think money solves every problem."
Don: "No, just this particular problem."

I loved Don's line to Roger too, gatz, and I loved it because there was a break in the middle. So it sounded like, "No one thinks you're happy. They think you're foolish." IMO, those last two lines I quoted were so effective because Jon Hamm fired them back at the speaker so quickly. It's one of Don's special powers, IMO. Hamm has great timing and it gives the impression that Don is always the master of the situation, whether he chooses to exercise it or not.

Man, that last scene between Peggy and Olive was fantastic. "I'm going to be fine, Olive." And I think I'm ready to call it, Tom, at least for my own self. It seems like they're saying Peggy really is creating her own destiny. So while the boys did present the opportunity of marijuana, and the boys did demonstrate how to get laid, she seems to be doing those things consciously and purposefully...IDK if I'm saying this right. I'm leaning toward Peggy NOT mimicking the guys or trying to have what they have (and what she SHOULD wnat) and more toward Peggy trying to have what she actually does want, both short-term and long-term.
marymary
Aug. 31st, 2009 10:54 pm (UTC)
Loved Pete dancing. That was very Pete, to have a choreographed routine in the can. :-)

Loved Joan on the accordion. Just...the way they revealed that was fabulous. She plays...something. We don't know what. And it turns out to be the accordion. Fantastic. The visual was also wonderful. And of course she manages to make it sexy.

Interesting looking at her marriage through my eyes. (And to do this, I have to put aside the fact that her fiance essentially raped her in the office that time.) The big dogs on this show are Don and Roger. And they're both good looking guys, and very successful. And I think we're meant to believe that, on some level, Joan feels she missed the chance to marry Roger and that he would have been her preference.

But I look at her hubby and go, "Um HOT." Depending on your taste, he's as good looking as JH and has a very nice body, apparently. Objectively better looking than Roger. And he's a doctor, so it's not like he's unemployed or something, regardless of how high he'll go in his profession. And that scene about the seating arrangements showed a pretty open and supportive relationship between them. Joan was snippy, but he took it well and they got to a good compromise. Imagine the same conversation between Don and Betty. Lots of distancing, I think. (Again, I cannot emphasize enough that I'm ignoring his disgusting behavior in the office for purposes of this discussion.)
marymary
Aug. 31st, 2009 11:06 pm (UTC)
Smitty, who seems to realize it's actually about talent, was great in this episode.

Yeah, Tom, I love him.

I like the sly running commentary about pedigree running through this episode.

Tom, you're right: there was a ton of racism and class-ism in this episode. As you guys mentioned, the blackface. Then Betty's dad's treatment of (ok, it's sort of hilarious that I can't remember her name right now) the maid. The comment about Pete being "in" because of his family, and that's ok. Don's conversation with the bartender. I always love Don scenes like that.

gatz, I totally agree that Sally is being portrayed as messed up, and that it seems to be due to her parents' bad relationship/separation and Betty's treatment. So this is going to sound bad, I guess, but sometimes my reaction to Betty's coldness to Sally isn't as strong as other people's. For two reasons.

- IF you balance that stuff out with affection at other times, it's a whole different thing. I actually do talk to my kids like that sometimes! But then at other times, I'm all over them with the hugs and kisses and I really take their personalities and their little likes and dislikes and victories and sorrows to heart. But I'm saying that by themselves, those scenes where Betty is very dismissive of Sally or Bobby don't bother me. What bothers me is that we don't see a lot of the affectionate stuff.

- Parenting is simply different nowadays. For the better, IMO. But, for Betty's era, Betty's not a mean mom at all. She's just not an indulgent mom. For her era, I'm saying. You can see that she's sweet with the kids sometimes, just in her...Nordic way.

(The one time I really was down on her was when she was encouraging Don to spank Bobby. That sorta makes my blood boil. I do prefer Don as a parent.)
tomfoolery815
Sep. 1st, 2009 05:34 am (UTC)
Mary, I agree about them bringing the funny. This may have been the funniest MM episode.

Don: "No, just this particular problem."
Yes! That was great! I also especially liked when Don hopped over the bar.

Connie: There’s a hole at the end here.
Don: I don’t have a lot of time.

I take that to be code for "My boss just mortified me, and I need to get drunk, stat."

It's one of Don's special powers, IMO. Hamm has great timing and it gives the impression that Don is always the master of the situation, whether he chooses to exercise it or not.
Oh, absolutely. He's the king of whatever room he walks into.



tomfoolery815
Sep. 1st, 2009 05:51 am (UTC)
It seems like they're saying Peggy really is creating her own destiny.
Let me start by stipulating that we essentially agree. :-)

So while the boys did present the opportunity of marijuana, and the boys did demonstrate how to get laid, she seems to be doing those things consciously and purposefully...IDK if I'm saying this right. I'm leaning toward Peggy NOT mimicking the guys or trying to have what they have (and what she SHOULD wnat) and more toward Peggy trying to have what she actually does want, both short-term and long-term.
I never meant to suggest that I thought she intended to mimic the guys. She wants the trappings of her status as a Madison Avenue copywriter to a degree, but that's not, IMO, about mimicking the guys. She hooks up with a guy and tries pot because she wants to, but also as a means of applying Don's post-natal advice to her to move forward. Moving forward, in Peggy's eyes IMO, means taking what she wants, regardless of what conventional thinking in early-'60s America says she should want. Rejecting that conventional thinking, actually.

I'm reminded of her Season 1 blind date in her hometown, when the Utz Potato Chips truck driver is slagging on Manhattanites. She says "Those people aren't better than you and me. They just want more than they know."

I think life, for Peggy, has become about wanting more than she knows.
flippet
Sep. 3rd, 2009 12:17 am (UTC)
Hey, I'm finally here. iTunes in its infinite wisdom withheld the download until this morning. :-P Although they emailed the availability reminder for this episode last Tuesday. For the win, iTunes, for the win.


Lookit who can dance! And seemed to be having a darn good time, too! :-) I wasn't getting the usual Petulant Pete vibe this episode, he seemed to be letting a lot more roll over him, and wasn't trying to ingratiate himself quite so much.

Also, Dope Boy was pulling quite the Tom Cruise vibe there, did anyone else get that? It was so obvious to me as to be weird and anachronistic.

Peggy getting baked was awesome. My favorite part was at the end, after she tried to convince her secretary that really, she had it *all* under control---and she was doing a great job of it, until she slowly turned to survey her domain, revealing the mussed side of her hair. I laughed out loud.

That final shot of Don going to Betty was gorgeous, and so long. It just kept going and going.

I was totally expecting Grandpa to be much harder on Sally. It was interesting that he wasn't. It seemed that he actually put some thought into how he handled the situation.

mary, I'm with you on Betty and her parenting. How classic was the scene where Sally zips up the dress? Glamorous mom, going out. It seems to me to be a bit of a holdover in how she was probably raised - mom is somewhat hands-off, and the maid/nanny raises the kids. The only difference is, this is a new generation, and Betty is doing a lot more of the direct work than her mother likely did. But the only 'mother' attitude she knows is the hands-off variety.

Although (and I can't remember where I got the first glimmer of this idea, it's not mine), Sally is what, ten? And this is 1963, right? She's right on track to have a high old time in the Summer of Love.
flippet
Sep. 3rd, 2009 12:25 am (UTC)
Oh, I was also going to say, I found it interesting that not only Don, but also Pete seemed to be uncomfortable with the blackface performance. I'm a little uncertain just how that would have been perceived at that point in time - I mean, it's incredibly offensive today, but wasn't that still a somewhat nebulous area then? I'm not sure just how the sense was falling. (I'd probably have to put it up directly against a Civil Rights timeline to check.)

But yeah...Don seems to be somewhat more sensitive than most to levels of offensiveness, injustice, etc, even if he doesn't always act on that sensitivity. But I was kind of surprised at Pete looking uncomfortable as well, given his need for social superiority. Especially when the rest of the crowd appeared indulgent, for the most part. I would have expected him to try to 'fit in' a bit more.
tomfoolery815
Sep. 3rd, 2009 12:51 am (UTC)
Also, Dope Boy was pulling quite the Tom Cruise vibe there, did anyone else get that?
I thought of Cruise also, Flipcy. Although, for me, it was more about his physical resemblance to Cruise.

That final shot of Don going to Betty was gorgeous, and so long. It just kept going and going.
ITA. Goodman said the shot suggested he was, in the end, a tad envious of Roger and Jane dancing (well, Roger dancing while keeping Jane upright), then apparently walking off by himself ... only to see he was walking toward Betty.

I was totally expecting Grandpa to be much harder on Sally. It was interesting that he wasn't. It seemed that he actually put some thought into how he handled the situation.
Me, too. It seemed as though he gave her credit for giving it back, albeit indirectly. And that he likes the bond they've formed over
"The History of the Decline of the Roman Empire." (Goodman: "a metaphorical moment not to be overlooked.")


tomfoolery815
Sep. 3rd, 2009 01:00 am (UTC)
not only Don, but also Pete seemed to be uncomfortable with the blackface performance.
Yes. Pete gets points for his discomfort, too.

As to the timeline: It's May 1963. So we're three months away from MLK's March on Washington, and a year away from two Jewish boys from NYC getting killed doing civil rights work in Mississippi (the "Mississippi Burning" case). So, especially given that we're talking about two guys who work in cosmopolitan Manhattan, it makes sense that they would be uncomfortable with what their boss was doing.

But we're also five years away from George Wallace running an effective third-party presidential candidacy by sowing white resentment over the blacks (ahem) getting uppity. So you have guys like Don and Pete knowing how offensive that is -- note that it's happening on the lawn of a country club, where surely the only blacks are caddies or dining staff -- and you have other guests either amused by, or indifferent to, Roger doing his Al Jolson.
amycurl
Sep. 3rd, 2009 05:40 pm (UTC)
tomfoolery815
Sep. 6th, 2009 06:01 pm (UTC)
The great John Slattery talks about, among other things, the moment Matt Weiner told him he'd be doing a scene in blackface:

http://blogs.amctv.com/mad-men/2009/09/john-slattery-interview.php
( 18 comments — Leave a comment )

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