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mad men: wee small hours



Season 3, Episode 9:  "Wee Small Hours"
Don and Sal both have difficultly giving the clients what they want. Betty hosts a fundraiser.

Don continues to be a good husband. Betty continues to annoy me. What will this week's episode bring? 

Come on in and discuss.

Comments

( 13 comments — Leave a comment )
edgeriffic
Oct. 12th, 2009 04:19 am (UTC)
Nooooo!!! Not Sal!!

First Joan, now Sal. Here's hoping there's a way at least one if not both of them come back to SC and soon.....
tomfoolery815
Oct. 12th, 2009 06:24 pm (UTC)
Hey Edgy! I'm glad you've come to keep Gatzy, Mary and I company in here. :-)
tomfoolery815
Oct. 12th, 2009 06:40 pm (UTC)
Another way in which Don and Peggy are similar: Rejection by a paternalistic figure drives him into someone else's arms, too.

It seemed inevitable that Don and Miss Farrell (according to the credits, she has no first name ;-) would get together. Simultaneously it seemed that, for once, Don was merely enjoying the flirtation.

But for Don to have Conrad Hilton -- one of the few people who knows the Dick Whitman inside Don Draper -- tell him he's a good boy, a good son ("Thank you. I mean it."), and then rebuke him? Well, Don's resistance to temptation is historically poor when things are going well.

Reason No. 467 why this is the Best Show on Television: The way they weave the events of the times into the narrative to reveal character.

Don: You think they can understand it? (MLK's "I Have a Dream" speech.)
Miss Farrell: I think they already know it. It'll be nice for them to hear an adult say it.
Don: Who are you? Are you dumb, or pure? ... running out here in the middle of the night, and I run into you? How did that happen?

Of course, Don last asked the "Who are you?" question in Palm Springs. And that beautiful woman said "I'm Joy." Hedonism. Having what you want when you want it.

Miss Farrell seems to represent the decade that's truly just under way here in Season 3. The Sixties as we know them now. The struggle over the future. Although, at the end of the episode, she also seems to represent having what you want. ;-)
tomfoolery815
Oct. 12th, 2009 06:54 pm (UTC)
Nooooo!!! Not Sal!!
So was Don suggesting that Sal should have let Lee Garner Jr. have what he wanted there in the editing room? His muttered "You people ..." seemed to suggest that, in Don's mind, there's no difference between getting it on with a Baltimore bellboy and keeping one of their biggest clients happy. Maybe I'm reading too much into it, but "you people" is clearly "you homosexuals."

The difference to Sal, of course, is massive. One was anonymous sex far from home, one was an unwanted advance from a client in the office. (At least it looked like it was at Sterling Cooper.)

It's awful that that happened to our Sal. But I'm also sure it's happening somewhere in America right now.
marymary
Oct. 13th, 2009 01:07 am (UTC)
I'm really glad Betty is cheating too. Her getting cheated on all the time was gross. This is better.

Aw, Sal! "You people" indeed. You people who know how to keep it in your pants at the workplace, apparently. So awful. I wonder whether the cruising is a new thing or if he's reacting strongly to his firing.
tomfoolery815
Oct. 19th, 2009 02:53 am (UTC)
I'm really glad Betty is cheating too. Her getting cheated on all the time was gross. This is better.
Heh-heh. I'm presuming you won't be seeing this in the new GQ. From JJ herself:

"I don't have a lot in common with Betty, but I'm very protective of her. I just feel she's trying really hard to make her life good, and make her marriage work, and it just seems hypocritical that when she slips up, people get mad. Because Don does it all the fucking time."

:-)
flippet
Oct. 27th, 2009 11:01 pm (UTC)
Late to the party again, sorry. :-)

I wonder whether the cruising is a new thing or if he's reacting strongly to his firing.


I got the impression it was fairly new, and he was reacting to the firing. Like, if this is what I get for resisting, to hell with resisting any more, let's just dive all the way in.
tomfoolery815
Oct. 29th, 2009 05:53 am (UTC)
Sounds about right, Flip. He turned down the guy at the fancy restaurant in Season 1, then rejected Lee Garner's advances because, presumably, he didn't want sex on those terms. Having been fired despite having done nothing wrong, it's easy to imagine him thinking "To hell with it, I'm getting laid."
kirjava
Oct. 14th, 2009 12:25 am (UTC)
The difference to Sal, of course, is massive. One was anonymous sex far from home, one was an unwanted advance from a client in the office. (At least it looked like it was at Sterling Cooper.)

It occurs to me that even if Sal had gone given the client what he wanted, the exact same sequence of events may have taken place afterwards.
gatsbyfan
Oct. 14th, 2009 01:02 pm (UTC)
Finally had a chance to watch last night.

Our streak of Don being a good husband comes to an end. You just knew it would be crazypants (the teacher).

I wonder whether the cruising is a new thing or if he's reacting strongly to his firing.
I thought it might be in reaction to getting fired. Otherwise, I would have expected a different reaction to the hotel employee.

It occurs to me that even if Sal had gone given the client what he wanted, the exact same sequence of events may have taken place afterwards.
I agree. I have a feeling that had he gave in, the client would have somehow used it against him.
tomfoolery815
Oct. 14th, 2009 09:35 pm (UTC)
It occurs to me that even if Sal had gone given the client what he wanted, the exact same sequence of events may have taken place afterwards.
I agree. I have a feeling that had he gave in, the client would have somehow used it against him.

I tend to disagree, Kirja and Gatzy. Garner is obviously somebody who's used to using his position of power to get what he wants. If Sal had given in -- and of course he shouldn't have, since he wasn't interested in -- he would have been conceding Garner's dominant role in the situation. (I'm guessing Garner isn't a bottom.)

Garner did what he did with Harry because Sal had refused to give in. Garner's actions are reprehensible and disgusting, but I don't think he would have made trouble for Sal if Sal had given Garner what he wanted. Again, not that Sal should ever have been put in that situation.

Our streak of Don being a good husband comes to an end. You just knew it would be crazypants (the teacher).
Yep.

For the record, I've consistently said that Don should be faithful to Betty. I'm just no longer surprised when he's unfaithful, because it's a recurring character flaw.
gatsbyfan
Oct. 15th, 2009 12:09 am (UTC)
I tend to disagree, Kirja and Gatzy.
Well, we were discussing this at work and a couple of us thought that no matter what Sal did, he was going to lose. If he did give in, there was no guarantee that Garner wouldn't use it against him in the future. Garner could have got upset and told one of them that Sal came on to him. (That way he doesn't out himself.)Garner doesn't know that Don knows Sal is gay. If Garner were even to suggest it, Sal might have been fired. Garner is a wild card.

tomfoolery815
Oct. 15th, 2009 12:58 am (UTC)
there was no guarantee that Garner wouldn't use it against him in the future.
That's certainly true. Garner has considerable power, and Sal is a closeted gay man in 1963.
( 13 comments — Leave a comment )

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